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On September 30, 2015 the U.S. House of Representative passed H.R. 719, which includes a provision that would extend the Internet Tax Freedom Act (ITFA) through December 11, 2015. The ITFA was scheduled to expire on October 1, 2015. The bill will now go to President Obama for signature.

 

To see our previous news item on the ITFA, visit Internet Tax Freedom Act Extended Until October 1, 2015, Permanent Extension Introduced.

 

To see an update on this news item, visit Internet Tax Freedom Act Extended Through October 1, 2016,

 

(H.R. 719)

(10/26/2015)

On June 15, 2015, Representative Jason Chaffetz (R-UT) introduced the Remote Transactions Parity Act (RTPA) of 2015 in the U.S. House of Representatives. The bill – similar to the Marketplace Fairness Act (MFA) of 2015 – pertains to sales and use taxcollection obligations for remote sellers, but the RTPA contains some differences and several additional provisions. Unlike the MFA’s $1 million small seller exception, the RTPA’s small seller exception is as follows: first year: $10 million; second year: $5 million; third year: $1 million. The exception goes away in the fourth year. Furthermore, under the RTPA sellers utilizing an electronic marketplace are not considered small sellers and are not entitled to the exception, no matter the year. Under the RTPA, sellers would not be audited by states where they don’t have a physical presence. There would be a three year statute of limitations for assessments on remote sellers. The bill would enable remote sellers to refund over-collected tax to customers. The RTPA also specifies that a state would not be authorized to impose a sales and use tax collection requirement on remote sellers until it has certified multiple software providers that are certified in all states seeking to impose authorization requirements. The RTPA would also allow customers to pursue refunds of over-collected tax from remote sellers. However, RTPA does not preempt states from imposing sales and use taxes on remote sellers that do not have physical presence under this definition. It merely authorizes states to impose sales and use tax on remote sellers without a physical presence. Under the RTPA, if a seller has nexus under existing law, including Quill v. North Dakota, then the state may still impose a sales and use tax collection requirement.  The bill is assigned to the Judiciary Committee just like the MFA.  On July 1, 2015 it was referred to the Subcommittee on Regulatory Reform, Commercial And Antitrust Law. (H.R. 2775, the Remote Transactions Parity Act of 2015)

 

UPDATE: This bill failed to pass during the 114th Congressional Session running from January 3, 2015 to January 3, 2017.  Therefore, this bill has died and would need to be reintroduced to be considered and voted on.

(09/08/2015)

Effective July 1, 2015, Wyoming has enacted a sales tax exemption for a lease or rental of tangible personal property when the lessor has directly or indirectly paid sales or use tax incidental to a lease or rental:

 

  • between parent and closely held subsidiary corporations,
  • between subsidiary corporations closely held by the same parent corporation, or
  • between affiliated companies, partnerships, corporations or other business entities that are owned in similar percentages by the same persons.

 

For purposes of the exemption, "business entity"means and includes an individual, partnership, corporation, corporate division, joint stock company, or any other association or entity, public or private, or separate business unit thereof. For purposes of the exemption, "closely held subsidiary corporation" means a corporation in which the parent corporation owns stock possessing at least 80% of the total combined voting power of all classes of stock entitled to vote and owns at least 80% of the total number of shares of all other classes of stock. (Ch. 44 (H.B. 52), Laws 2015, effective July 1, 2015)

(05/20/2015)

On a monthly basis, after 30 days’ notice provided by first class mail, the Wyoming Department of Revenue will post on its website the names of delinquent vendors or taxpayers who are 150 days or more overdue on payment of sales or use taxes and have not entered into a payment arrangement with the department. Additionally, the taxpayer’s sales and use tax license number, physical address, and unpaid balance owed will be posted on the website. (Ch. 140 (S.F. 124), Laws 2015, effective July 1, 2015)

(03/30/2015)

On March 10, 2015, a bipartisan group of senators introduced the Marketplace Fairness Act of 2015. Similar legislation – the Marketplace Fairness Act of 2013 – was previously introduced in February 2013 and passed by the Senate on May 6, 2013. That legislation failed to be enacted. If passed, the Marketplace Fairness Act of 2015 would authorize states meeting certain requirements to require remote sellers that do not meet a "small seller exception" to collect their state and local sales and use taxes. For more information on the previous legislation, visit Federal Government Introduces New Remote Seller Bill. (Marketplace Fairness Act of 2015, March 10, 2015)

 

UPDATE: This bill failed to pass during the 114th Congressional Session running from January 3, 2015 to January 3, 2017.  Therefore, this bill has died and would need to be reintroduced to be considered and voted on.

(03/16/2015)

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